Index

Index
The153 Club
The Agades Cross
People of the Sahara
Saharan Landscapes
Books on the Sahara(1)
Books on the Sahara(2)
Books on African Art
Saharan Salt Trade
The Gundi
Illizi Festival 2000
Sahara Freeze-up
Camel Cheese
153 News Update
Join the 153 Club

Père de Foucauld
L'Arbre du Ténéré 1
L'Arbre du Ténéré 2
Saharan Forts 1
Saharan Forts 2
Saharan Rock Art
Giraffe Engravings
Leo Africanus
Battuta's Saharan travels
Shabeni's Timbuktu
Timbuctoo the Mysterious
Heroditus & Pliny on Libya
Timbuktu, a poem

Joliba Trust
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 1
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 2
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 3
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 4
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 5
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 6

Old Michelin Maps
Early NW Africa Map 1
Early NW Africa Map 2
Early NW Africa Map 3
Early NW Africa Map 4
Early NW Africa Map 5
Saharan Exploration

Henry Barth 1
Henry Barth 2
Henry Barth 3
Denham & Clapperton 1
Denham & Clapperton 2
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 1
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 2
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 3
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 4

External Links

Jim Mann Taylor's Home Page
___________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

153 News Update, July 2018

This update has been compiled by Christer Wilkinson from a variety of sources.

Niger
The main news In Niger this month has again been on the refugee/migrant situation.
In the north, as a result of the press reports about the expulsion of refugees from Algeria across the southern Algeria border to walk to Assamakka, the Niger northern frontier post, some reports came in that these had stopped. Then they had started again, and then stopped again. This situation is unclear and recent reports vary.
During the month reports also came in from the IOM for May confirming a net inflow of people from Libya and Algeria back to Niger via Arlit and Agades. It appears that some people are still leaving Niger but now more are returning and this is putting pressure on services in Arlit and Agades.
The main source of inflow is from Algeria. More people in May were still going to Libya than returning. The observed flow was some 6000. In June the figures dropped dramatically (summer?) to around 2000 and there was small net inflow from both Algeria and Libya. There are of course still some 250,000 refugees/displaced persons in the Diffa region, and 50,000 refugees near the Mali border.
There was yet another announcement of an oil find in the Agadem region of Niger. In the same region near Diffa there was a savage attack by Boko Harem rebels which killed at least ten Niger soldiers.
No news this month about any of the western hostages, but the son of Sophie Petronin was reported to be in Niger to attempt to visit his mother. The outcome was not reported.
The annual rains in Niger this year killed 13 people and an uncertain number of animals, (but probably thousands), and damaged some 17,000 homes. The areas of Maradi, Agades and Diffa were the worst affected, according to the reports: and there was a new cholera outbreak with some 250 cases.
Towards the end of the month six opposition figures were released from prison after several months.
Mali
The main news this month was the presidential elections in Mali: the election activity is mostly in the south, where most of the population of Mali resides. These were still going on as the month ended but initial reports indicated that the incumbent (IBK) was in the lead. In mid-July IBK was reported to have actually visited Kidal in the north for the first time in five years.
Further north, there were numerous reports on incidents in the center of the country, including conflicts between tribal groups, and attacks on government and UN forces near Mopti.
In the far north of Mali, there were fewer reports of rebel incidents than usual, but one report from near Gao confirmed that civilians are now becoming a target of the rebel groups as well as the military, including one attack on an electoral material convoy near Segou, in the center of the country.
No new western hostages were reported and there was no news about existing western hostages.
The IOM reported an almost balanced incoming and outgoing migrant’s movement in June into and out of Mali with a very limited flow of 240 a day. There are still a reported 50,000 Mali refugees in Niger, 50,000 in Mauritania and 25,000 in Burkina Faso.
Tchad
Tchad was again quieter than either Niger or Mali as far as rebel incident were concerned. Even so there was one attack near Lake Tchad by Boko Harem which killed a reported 18 inhabitants. As always accounts differ.
Tchad’s refuge problem is still immense, and the large number on the east side of the country no longer attracts press reports. The figures are daunting:
· 331,000 refugees /displaced people in the east near the Sudan
· 150,00 refugees /displaced people in the south near the CAR
· 180,000 refugees /displaced people near Lake Tchad

In the meantime life continues in Tchad in its own way. The strikes have faded, but discontent with the economy remains. A least with the oil price holding higher, the income from oil in Tchad is up from last year.

In the far north the challenges from border smuggling of drugs etc. to and from Libya is reported to be continuing. Yet another frontier agreement was signed with Libya in July, who complained that mercenaries from Tchad rebel groups were involved in the inter-group conflicts in Libya.

The IOM reports on the northern and western borders of Tchad indicate an increase in traffic in April (last period available): but a significantly lower levels than for Mali and Niger. Of course the frontier is more open in Tchad and the monitoring points more spread out.

A proposal to move the regional government head offices for the Ennedi region from Fada to d’Amdjarass (the president’s home town) was the subject of a protest.

Another protest came from Amnesty International about the Tchad government’s human rights violations. The Tchad government issued a prompt denial.

 

Index

Index
The153 Club
The Agades Cross
People of the Sahara
Saharan Landscapes
Books on the Sahara(1)
Books on the Sahara(2)
Books on African Art
Saharan Salt Trade
The Gundi
Illizi Festival 2000
Sahara Freeze-up
Camel Cheese
153 Club Newsletter
153 News Update
Join the 153 Club
Today's African News

Père de Foucauld
L'Arbre du Ténéré 1
L'Arbre du Ténéré 2
Saharan Forts 1
Saharan Forts 2
Saharan Rock Art
Giraffe Engravings
Leo Africanus
Battuta's Saharan travels
Shabeni's Timbuktu
Timbuctoo the Mysterious
Heroditus & Pliny on Libya
Timbuktu, a poem

Joliba Trust
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 1
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 2
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 3
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 4
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 5
Ibn Khaldûn quotes 6

Old Michelin Maps
Early NW Africa Map 1
Early NW Africa Map 2
Early NW Africa Map 3
Early NW Africa Map 4
Early NW Africa Map 5
Saharan Exploration

Henry Barth 1
Henry Barth 2
Henry Barth 3
Denham & Clapperton 1
Denham & Clapperton 2
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 1
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 2
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 3
Haardt & Audouin-Dubreuil 4

External Links

Jim Mann Taylor's Home Page
___________________________